Archive for category careers

Don’t make these common mistakes on your tech resume.

healthcare-technology-8-04-2015Writing a professional tech resume seems simple enough, but there’s an art to writing a great one. To improve your own resume and make landing the interviews you want easier, check your resume against these common mistakes.

 Stretching the truth.

With tech employers getting pickier about exactly what sort of technical skills they need, it may be tempting to exaggerate some of the details on your resume. But it almost never pays off in the long run. The truth is, tech recruiters do their research – and often discover these stretches. And even when they don’t, if you get the job, your new company will likely realize that how you came across on paper is inconsistent with how you perform on the job. It’s better to exceed expectations than to disappoint, so just be honest from the get-go – starting with your resume.

 Not being specific enough.

While it’s important to be honest on your resume, it’s also important to give yourself credit where credit is due. And that means replacing vague, meaningless language with impactful, specific actions. For example, instead of just saying you “created software,” include the type of software, your exact role, and the result of your efforts.

 Skipping your results.

Don’t just list your projects and job responsibilities. Explain the impact you had on your organization. After all, this is the bottom line of what any hiring manager really wants to know – how you will impact their organization.

 Forgetting about keywords.

If your skills are in engineering, information technology, or finance or accounting, don’t forget to include more specific keywords, that speak to exactly to your expertise and skill set, in the body of your resume. Recruiters scan for these words in order to find the perfect fit for each available job – and so do programs created to sort through digital resumes. Make sure yours doesn’t get lost, just because you weren’t specific enough about your technical skills.

 Setting the wrong tone.

Be professional in tone. Always. That means forget trying to be funny – it’s difficult to pull off and can come across as silly, and not in a good way. So just convey the facts succinctly, cordially, and effectively. If you’ve done that, you’ll eventually end up on the desk of the hiring manager, for a company where you’ll be a great fit.

 Looking for the perfect new career opportunity in engineering, information technology, finance or accounting? Go to TRC Professional Solutions to learn more.

 

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Takeaways from the August 2016 BLS Jobs Report

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=jobs&view=detailv2&&id=C5F59CE7F748269BB43CAB1DE34C8ECF981851E4&selectedIndex=2&ccid=c6Jc95ja&simid=608055722586080895&thid=OIP.M73a25cf798da52a118e454eedfffa3dbo0&ajaxhist=0People are back at work after a long Labor Day weekend – though perhaps not as many as economists had predicted. Let’s take a look at the August 2016 BLS jobs report.

 1. Pay didn’t increase as much as predicted. Average hourly wages were only up .12% (3 cents) from last month, whereas last year they were up 2.4% from a year ago. According to the Wall Street Journal, this could have something to do with the fact that the lowest-paying sector – “food services and drinking places” – also added the most jobs of the month. 

 2. Fewer jobs were added. While 270,000 jobs were added in July, only 151,000 jobs were added in August. That’s a sharp decrease, and also less than the consensus, which had been 180,000. Still, that number is considered enough to absorb workforce growth, says bankrate.com.

 3. It’s not as bad as it sounds. For some reason, possibly due to school starting, August numbers have often been disappointing. This is why economists say month-by-month reporting isn’t as reliable as year-by-year reporting. Plus, while the numbers aren’t great, they still show steady if slow growth.

 

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Three times you should always follow up

FollowUPThree times you should always follow up

Picture it. You’ve been searching for a job for weeks now, and you’ve even had some interest in the form of recruiters reaching out for interviews. But you haven’t found that perfect job you know must be out there somewhere. Suddenly, you see it. The job description matches exactly what you’ve been looking for. You submit your application. A few days go by. And you start to wonder…when, and how, should you follow up?

If you seem too eager, will you scare them off? Too persistent, and you might annoy them? But if you don’t reach out and show you really want the job, will someone else beat you to the punch?

Whereas before, you didn’t bother overthinking the follow-up process because the stakes weren’t that high, now you really want this job – and you don’t want to ruin your chances by making the wrong move.

The truth is, everything will be just fine and if you’re meant to have that job, you’ll get it. But to eliminate some doubt, here are three specific circumstances where you should absolutely follow up.

 1.  When you didn’t get an automated response.  After submitting your application, wait 24 hours. If you haven’t received an email assuring you your application was received, contact the hiring manager (if possible) with a polite email to let them know you’ve applied and are excited to hear more about the opportunity (don’t forget to attach your resume).

 2.   After the interview.  Always, always send a thank-you note. These days, an email is often appropriate, but a hand-written note will show you went the extra mile.  Don’t let too much time pass between the interview and the follow up. Later that day, or the next day is best.

 3.  When you didn’t get the job.  Just because you didn’t land the job this time, doesn’t mean you won’t be considered at a later date. A well-crafted follow up, thanking them for their time, and expressing interest in future consideration, will make you seem like a class act who genuinely wants to work there. You’ll keep the doors open, and you never know what may come of it down the road.

Ready for a great new opportunity. Check out the TRC Staffing job boards today.

 

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How to Change Your Career Specialty

https://www.google.com/search?safe=active&site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=934&q=changing+careers&oq=changing+careers&gs_l=img.3..0l4j0i30l3j0i5i30j0i24l2.866.2517.0.2596.16.12.0.3.3.0.140.854.11j1.12.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..1.15.872.sXOb-80cOs4#imgrc=wD9gUJkg5QTdSM%3AChanging jobs has its challenges, but changing fields is a whole other matter. No matter how much theoretical knowledge you may possess, the bottom line is that hiring managers really like you to have experience. That doesn’t mean you should let your lack of experience deter you from taking a risk and trying something new. Everyone has to start somewhere, and jumping through a few hoops in the short term can really pay off for your long-term happiness.

Let’s say you’ve been working in IT for 10 years, and you’d really like to move to a new field of information technology. While you’ve studied up on your own and feel you’ve got a good understanding of the field, you don’t have any actual work experience. How do you proceed?

First, keep in mind that if you’ve been a strong performer and are highly valued in your current position, this will speak volumes to hiring managers. That’s because employers are smart enough to choose a sure bet over someone with a perfect skillset who doesn’t have a clear history of always delivering. So make sure you’ve got measurable results to show, as well as recommendations from bosses and colleagues.

Your past success isn’t all you’ll need, if you want to change fields. Make sure you invest in any classes that can help get you fully up to speed on the required skills. You can also join professional organizations and attend events to learn about what’s going on in the field. List these classes and organizations on your resume.

Another great idea is to request a meeting with a hiring manager or recruiter. Without having to be selected for a formal interview, you’ll frame it as a conversation. You can then discuss your goals, and how what you’re working on now relates to what’s required in your new field.

Finally, don’t give up. It may take a little time to make the change, but if you keep at it, it will happen.

Looking for new opportunities in your field, or in a brand new one? We love hearing from qualified candidates. Check out job openings at companies all over the country with TRC Staffing Services, Inc.

 

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How to make your Facebook account prospective employer-friendly

https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=934&q=facebook&oq=faceb&gs_l=img.3.0.0l10.734.1400.0.2297.5.4.0.1.1.0.64.242.4.4.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.5.253.ihyWsXnR6Mk#imgrc=rgGNW5no1Elv-M%3AAre you one of those graduates who really enjoyed college…and posted it all over your newsfeed? Don’t worry. You may not be able to fix any damage that has already been done, but you still can clean up your current account so that it doesn’t come across as unprofessional to future employers.

Facebook is the number-one social network, and it seems like everyone uses it. Currently, there are more than 1.59 billion active accounts. Facebook is popular because it allows old friends to connect, new friends to talk, and everyone to enjoy a convenient online community.

It’s also proven to be a useful tool for recruiters. More than 94% of recruiters use social media to find candidates for open positions. If your feed is filled with dancing monkeys, it might not come off as the most professional page. Even if you don’t plan on using a staffing company to find a job right out of college, your potential employers will still do their homework. So how can you clean up your current account? Check out the basics of Facebook’s privacy policy below!

Let’s start with photos. Any pictures that you have uploaded to Facebook can be edited by you. A great place to start cleaning up your digital presence is to simply go through old photos. Take down anything that you would find embarrassing if an employer pulled it up.

How do I edit my photos? Simply go through your photos, click one you don’t like, push edit, and voila! You can edit who you were with, where you were, the date, and the time. You can even edit the privacy settings and choose who you want to be able to see the images (i.e. public, friends, or only you). However, if you are considering posting something online in the future that is only for your eyes – maybe you shouldn’t be posting it at all. Anything posted online is never truly private.

As for photos that other people have uploaded and tagged you in, you can either untag yourself or ask them to remove the photos altogether. Then, make sure to adjust your privacy settings so that you must approve every post you are tagged in. That way, you will be able to decide whether or not the post is “allowed on timeline” or “hidden from timeline.”

Your Facebook privacy settings tool even shows you which apps are connected to your account. Any connected apps can share the information you’ve uploaded to Facebook. So go through and decide which apps you might need to remove from your Facebook account.

Also, don’t forget to edit your Facebook profile. Any information you’ve made public can be deleted or adjusted. If you are also interested in editing who can see what, you can also do that in the profile section. For instance, you might want to make your professional email public so that recruiters can contact you, but keep your personal phone number set on “only me.”

Finally, scroll down your personal newsfeed. If you see any posts that feel inappropriate, simply click on the down arrow and delete them.

Do you have any tips or tricks for keeping your personal Facebook account professional? We’d love to hear about them in the comments section below!

 

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What can we do about the widening technology skills gap?

https://goo.gl/8lFidrA 2013 study funded by Microsoft found that each year, 230,000 new tech jobs are created. The report also showed that each year, only 49,000 students graduate with a computer science-focused degree. That leaves more than 70,000 jobs available – so why are eight million people in the U.S. unemployed, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics?

It’s called a skills gap, and the U.S. job market as a whole is experiencing it. There are Millennials straight out of college applying for jobs that they are under-qualified for – not because they lack field experience, but because they didn’t receive the college education needed to complete the tasks at hand.

Though the entire job market is being affected by the skills gap, the technology market is taking one of the hardest hits. In a recent article about the tech skills gap, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says that software development, data science, and systems engineering are among those STEM fields suffering the most from the talent gap.

Another skills gap study, conducted by Microsoft and Washington State, finds that one out of two jobs requires tech skills. Within the next ten years this number is predicted to increase to three out of four jobs. With Millennials unable to land these jobs, and employers unable to hire candidates, the market is not progressing.

This all sounds pretty negative . . . but it’s actually the perfect opportunity for people interested in pursuing a career in technology. Here’s why. By 2020, IT salaries alone are predicted to rise by 5.1% per year. The fewer qualified candidates there are for the technology field, the more invaluable tech gurus will become.

One way the tech industry is tackling the problem head on is through education. Companies are offering mentorships, industry experts are sharing their knowledge for free through blogs and online coding tutorials, and companies are even providing free training. For example, the Microsoft Software and Systems Academy teaches technology courses to active-duty military service members, in an effort to prepare them for the workforce upon completion of their military duties.

As for those who want a great career in technology – the key is to get the education needed to be successful – the education that, for some reason, others are not receiving. Research programs and education tracks before attending any program or school. Ask about success rates and investigate what the tech community has to say about those programs. The opinion of the tech community will tell you a lot about whether or not an education program will lead to a successful career.

Have you already received a great education? Are you ready to dive in to the technology field? Check out the Top Five Stem Cities for Employment on the TRC Professional Solutions blog to find the perfect city for your career.

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What You Post Today, Will Affect You Tomorrow: A Social Media Lesson from Yelp

https://www.google.com/search?safe=active&site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=934&q=fired+by+social+media&oq=fired+by+social+media&gs_l=img.3..0i24.988.3554.0.3753.21.9.0.12.12.0.88.596.9.9.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.21.632.okZh9zbDtwk#imgrc=JBBqGfFgm_IlmM%3AIf you have been keeping up with the latest Technology news, you have probably heard about the dissatisfied Yelp girl. If you haven’t, the Yelp employee (Talia Jane, 25) was a Customer-Support Representative based out of Silicon Valley. She wrote a very detailed, emotional blog called “An Open Letter To My CEO” – which went into depth about the San Francisco housing crisis, her emotional stress, poor wages paid by her employer, and a little bit about her career aspirations.

“So here I am, 25 years old, balancing all sorts of debt and trying to pave a life for myself that doesn’t involve crying in the bathtub every week.”- Talia Jane

After the blog was posted, Talia Jane was let go from her position at Yelp almost immediately. There has been a lot of discussion on social media the matter. Most of the talk is being based around tech wages, Millennials, and whether or not the girl should have been let go at all. All of these discussions are valid, but there is one discussion in particular that should be duly noted. It is VITAL to always stay professional on social media, even if you believe you have a valid point to make regarding your employment.

This situation is a prime example of letting your emotions take hold of your career. Talia went from having a job that paid the bills (kinda), to not having a job at all. In her case, she is getting a lot of attention but that isn’t the case for everyone who declares war on a company through social media. In fact, if you break any HR policies by talking negatively about your company or providing “insider information”, you can even get sued.

Misusing social media will not only affect your career today but tomorrow as well. If you speak negatively online about people or companies, remember that other will see this. Future employers will be unimpressed, recruiters will see it as unprofessional, and you could damage a potential job interview before you even have a chance to speak with the company.

If you are feeling frustrated with your work, take a step back and look at the big picture. Whatever your problems is – you don’t like your job, your boss is rude, you don’t like the person who sits near you, etc. is it really going to help if you post about it online? Even if your account settings are on lock-down and are private, nothing is private online. Someone, somewhere, could find it . . . leaving you one screenshot away from dipping into your savings.

Whatever your problem is at work: think through it; or talk it over with someone who is separated from the situation, and think about your career logically. Acting in the moment doesn’t always help (though sometimes we admit it does feel good). Even if you can’t fix your problem and want to leave, put in your two weeks’ notice the appropriate way. This way, you can use your current company as a reference.

Everyone has positive and negative situations they have to handle at work. What are a few professional tips you have to relieve stress? Tell us about them by commenting below.

 

 

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