Archive for category jobs of the future

Unexpected ways you’ll be evaluated by recruiters.

Spark-Hire-Reasons-To-Find-A-New-Recruiter-870x400We all know the typical things recruiters look for in any job candidate. But there are also some unexpected ways they go about assessing your skills. Here are a few specific tricks hiring managers, potential bosses and recruiters use to determine what’ll happen once you’re out of the interview and on the job.

Big data. Today, recruiters can use tools that aggregate a candidate’s online presence, scouring profiles, forums, shared projects, and posts to form a more comprehensive picture of your skills, interests, and behaviors. What they say is true: be aware that the things you do online in “public” places should always be things you wouldn’t mind a potential employer seeing.

Receptionists. Yes, hiring managers often refer to office receptionists to get a little more information about how you behave when in front of people you don’t necessarily expect to be evaluating you. Some companies even go so far as to have receptionists fill out their own evaluations of candidates during their brief time in the lobby. So even though it seems obvious, always be courteous and put your best face forward for everyone.

Checks for consistency. Recruiters often check to see if claims on your resume and other professional materials match up with your actions online. If you claim you’re one thing, but the organizations you belong to and job boards you frequent say another, they’ll question your legitimacy.

Surprise tactics. Potential employers sometimes like to get you out of your comfort zone, to see how you’ll react when you’re caught off guard. They may call you after hours, or interrupt you in the middle of an interview panel or test, to see how you handle it. Whatever your potential employer throws your way, it’s okay to be genuinely surprised – just go with the flow, and above all – always be polite.

References you didn’t provide. If a potential boss or hiring manager knows someone you worked with or for, they’ll often reach out, whether you included this person on your list of references or not. That’s just the reality of the small world we live in – word of mouth is your best form of advertising. So even though we all have people we didn’t exactly jive with, do your best to never burn bridges.

Are we missing anything? What are some other screening tactics job candidates should be aware of during their search? We’d love to hear your experience in the comments section below.

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Why more tech professionals are quitting their jobs.

https://goo.gl/SD7HxB

Male Architect With Digital Tablet Studying Plans In Office

In April, more tech professionals quit their jobs than in March. This is according to the latest U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey. And it’s part of a continuing trend, as this quarter, more techies quit than in the last. 

Why the voluntary quits? Many workers are simply leaving their current positions to accept or search for new, better ones that pay more for their skill set. This confidence in their ability to find new jobs suggests a strong economy, at least where tech is concerned. 

But besides money, there are other reasons more tech pros are quitting their jobs. A recent Dice survey found that 43 percent of tech professionals who plan on quitting are searching for better working conditions. A third of the workers who are leaving their jobs desire more responsibility within their position. Another 16 percent are looking for a shorter commute, while 14 percent are relocating. And companies are taking notice. 

As tech professionals get choosier, employers are responding by increasing incentives to retain them. More companies are offering higher compensation, more challenging assignments, flexible work schedules, opportunities to work remotely, and more frequent promotions. 

All that to say, it’s a great time to be in tech. If you’re interested in pursuing your own new opportunities, the cards are stacked in your favor. Check out TRC Staffing Solutions for jobs available in your desired area.

 

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How to make your Facebook account prospective employer-friendly

https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=934&q=facebook&oq=faceb&gs_l=img.3.0.0l10.734.1400.0.2297.5.4.0.1.1.0.64.242.4.4.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.5.253.ihyWsXnR6Mk#imgrc=rgGNW5no1Elv-M%3AAre you one of those graduates who really enjoyed college…and posted it all over your newsfeed? Don’t worry. You may not be able to fix any damage that has already been done, but you still can clean up your current account so that it doesn’t come across as unprofessional to future employers.

Facebook is the number-one social network, and it seems like everyone uses it. Currently, there are more than 1.59 billion active accounts. Facebook is popular because it allows old friends to connect, new friends to talk, and everyone to enjoy a convenient online community.

It’s also proven to be a useful tool for recruiters. More than 94% of recruiters use social media to find candidates for open positions. If your feed is filled with dancing monkeys, it might not come off as the most professional page. Even if you don’t plan on using a staffing company to find a job right out of college, your potential employers will still do their homework. So how can you clean up your current account? Check out the basics of Facebook’s privacy policy below!

Let’s start with photos. Any pictures that you have uploaded to Facebook can be edited by you. A great place to start cleaning up your digital presence is to simply go through old photos. Take down anything that you would find embarrassing if an employer pulled it up.

How do I edit my photos? Simply go through your photos, click one you don’t like, push edit, and voila! You can edit who you were with, where you were, the date, and the time. You can even edit the privacy settings and choose who you want to be able to see the images (i.e. public, friends, or only you). However, if you are considering posting something online in the future that is only for your eyes – maybe you shouldn’t be posting it at all. Anything posted online is never truly private.

As for photos that other people have uploaded and tagged you in, you can either untag yourself or ask them to remove the photos altogether. Then, make sure to adjust your privacy settings so that you must approve every post you are tagged in. That way, you will be able to decide whether or not the post is “allowed on timeline” or “hidden from timeline.”

Your Facebook privacy settings tool even shows you which apps are connected to your account. Any connected apps can share the information you’ve uploaded to Facebook. So go through and decide which apps you might need to remove from your Facebook account.

Also, don’t forget to edit your Facebook profile. Any information you’ve made public can be deleted or adjusted. If you are also interested in editing who can see what, you can also do that in the profile section. For instance, you might want to make your professional email public so that recruiters can contact you, but keep your personal phone number set on “only me.”

Finally, scroll down your personal newsfeed. If you see any posts that feel inappropriate, simply click on the down arrow and delete them.

Do you have any tips or tricks for keeping your personal Facebook account professional? We’d love to hear about them in the comments section below!

 

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What can we do about the widening technology skills gap?

https://goo.gl/8lFidrA 2013 study funded by Microsoft found that each year, 230,000 new tech jobs are created. The report also showed that each year, only 49,000 students graduate with a computer science-focused degree. That leaves more than 70,000 jobs available – so why are eight million people in the U.S. unemployed, per the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics?

It’s called a skills gap, and the U.S. job market as a whole is experiencing it. There are Millennials straight out of college applying for jobs that they are under-qualified for – not because they lack field experience, but because they didn’t receive the college education needed to complete the tasks at hand.

Though the entire job market is being affected by the skills gap, the technology market is taking one of the hardest hits. In a recent article about the tech skills gap, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says that software development, data science, and systems engineering are among those STEM fields suffering the most from the talent gap.

Another skills gap study, conducted by Microsoft and Washington State, finds that one out of two jobs requires tech skills. Within the next ten years this number is predicted to increase to three out of four jobs. With Millennials unable to land these jobs, and employers unable to hire candidates, the market is not progressing.

This all sounds pretty negative . . . but it’s actually the perfect opportunity for people interested in pursuing a career in technology. Here’s why. By 2020, IT salaries alone are predicted to rise by 5.1% per year. The fewer qualified candidates there are for the technology field, the more invaluable tech gurus will become.

One way the tech industry is tackling the problem head on is through education. Companies are offering mentorships, industry experts are sharing their knowledge for free through blogs and online coding tutorials, and companies are even providing free training. For example, the Microsoft Software and Systems Academy teaches technology courses to active-duty military service members, in an effort to prepare them for the workforce upon completion of their military duties.

As for those who want a great career in technology – the key is to get the education needed to be successful – the education that, for some reason, others are not receiving. Research programs and education tracks before attending any program or school. Ask about success rates and investigate what the tech community has to say about those programs. The opinion of the tech community will tell you a lot about whether or not an education program will lead to a successful career.

Have you already received a great education? Are you ready to dive in to the technology field? Check out the Top Five Stem Cities for Employment on the TRC Professional Solutions blog to find the perfect city for your career.

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What You Post Today, Will Affect You Tomorrow: A Social Media Lesson from Yelp

https://www.google.com/search?safe=active&site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=934&q=fired+by+social+media&oq=fired+by+social+media&gs_l=img.3..0i24.988.3554.0.3753.21.9.0.12.12.0.88.596.9.9.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.21.632.okZh9zbDtwk#imgrc=JBBqGfFgm_IlmM%3AIf you have been keeping up with the latest Technology news, you have probably heard about the dissatisfied Yelp girl. If you haven’t, the Yelp employee (Talia Jane, 25) was a Customer-Support Representative based out of Silicon Valley. She wrote a very detailed, emotional blog called “An Open Letter To My CEO” – which went into depth about the San Francisco housing crisis, her emotional stress, poor wages paid by her employer, and a little bit about her career aspirations.

“So here I am, 25 years old, balancing all sorts of debt and trying to pave a life for myself that doesn’t involve crying in the bathtub every week.”- Talia Jane

After the blog was posted, Talia Jane was let go from her position at Yelp almost immediately. There has been a lot of discussion on social media the matter. Most of the talk is being based around tech wages, Millennials, and whether or not the girl should have been let go at all. All of these discussions are valid, but there is one discussion in particular that should be duly noted. It is VITAL to always stay professional on social media, even if you believe you have a valid point to make regarding your employment.

This situation is a prime example of letting your emotions take hold of your career. Talia went from having a job that paid the bills (kinda), to not having a job at all. In her case, she is getting a lot of attention but that isn’t the case for everyone who declares war on a company through social media. In fact, if you break any HR policies by talking negatively about your company or providing “insider information”, you can even get sued.

Misusing social media will not only affect your career today but tomorrow as well. If you speak negatively online about people or companies, remember that other will see this. Future employers will be unimpressed, recruiters will see it as unprofessional, and you could damage a potential job interview before you even have a chance to speak with the company.

If you are feeling frustrated with your work, take a step back and look at the big picture. Whatever your problems is – you don’t like your job, your boss is rude, you don’t like the person who sits near you, etc. is it really going to help if you post about it online? Even if your account settings are on lock-down and are private, nothing is private online. Someone, somewhere, could find it . . . leaving you one screenshot away from dipping into your savings.

Whatever your problem is at work: think through it; or talk it over with someone who is separated from the situation, and think about your career logically. Acting in the moment doesn’t always help (though sometimes we admit it does feel good). Even if you can’t fix your problem and want to leave, put in your two weeks’ notice the appropriate way. This way, you can use your current company as a reference.

Everyone has positive and negative situations they have to handle at work. What are a few professional tips you have to relieve stress? Tell us about them by commenting below.

 

 

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How to Generate More Women in STEM

https://www.google.com/search?safe=active&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=911&q=women+in+stem&oq=women+in+stem&gs_l=img.3..0l10.928.2205.0.2355.13.12.0.1.1.0.145.1306.5j7.12.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.13.1309.IE3oz6a1qvo#imgrc=z_7ffiXUPbsJ7M%3AIt’s no secret, there are not enough women in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math industries. The U.S. Department of Commerce showed women – compared to men – only make up of 24% of STEM jobs. Why is this? Why are there so few women?

A research report by AAUW showed that women face environmental and social barriers that prevent progress. These barriers include everything from stereotyping to gender biases. How can these biases be defeated to create a level playing field for Women in STEM? By generating more interest in the next generation of women.

Most STEM positions require a degree, which is why it is so important to start educating younger generations now. One specific group dedicated to doing just that is women from Empire Company Limited, which recently partnered with a local non-profit organization named Sacred SISTAHS to run workshops for over 150 African American girls ages 13-18. These girls are being educated and given opportunities to speak with influential women in these four industries. For some of the girls, it’s their first experience with Science, Technology, Engineering and Math and it’s sparking an interest!

Another way influential leaders are helping to develop diversity is by mentoring women at an early age. They are fighting the stereotypes that girls in STEM are “nerdy”, and are providing contacts and networks for these young women’s futures.

In addition, the White House Council on Women and Girls is collaborating with The Office of Science and Technology to increase women and girls participation in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math industries.

One of the things that I really strongly believe in is that we need to have more girls interested in math, science, and engineering. We’ve got half the population that is way underrepresented in those fields and that means that we’ve got a whole bunch of talent…not being encouraged the way they need to.”

— President Barack Obama, February 2013

With the STEM industries projected growth from 2008-2018 to be 17%, how could women not want to focus on receiving degrees to better their current job, or find a future one? Rightfully so, STEM workers receive 33% higher wages compared to non-STEM positions.

Are you interested in applying for open STEM positions now? Check out TRC Professional Solutions job board for current available positions.

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The Present & Future of STEM Careers

STEM CareersOver the past few years, one of the largest growth areas of employment has remained in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). While the economy improves, technological advancements continue to create more opportunities in the workforce. There is still an overwhelming amount of opportunities that are in high demand of specialized talent and skill; but the real question is, are there enough candidates to fill these slots?

According to CNN, STEM jobs are growing at 1.7 times the rate of non-STEM related jobs. The reality is, STEM careers are the backbone and future of the U.S. economy, but sadly we do not have enough candidates to fill these open positions in today’s job market. In 2014, the Department of Education revealed that only 16% of high school seniors have an interest in pursuing STEM careers.

To put this in perspective, in 2012, there were more than 7.4 million workers in the fields of science and technology and there will be an estimate of 8.6 million STEM workers by 2018. The Obama administration alone is investing millions of dollars to produce one million STEM undergrads by 2022.

Which segment of STEM careers is the most popular amongst today’s emerging millennials? According to U.S. News, Mechanical Engineering takes the lead and “a little more than 20% of STEM students have an affinity for designing, developing, and testing various tools and devices.”

Zach Sines, Recruiting Team Lead at TRC Professional Solutions, provides his insight on the present and future of STEM careers. He advises, “Students should take a look at STEM-based degrees when choosing a major in college, and even look at getting additional exposure before that in high school. There are degrees that bridge the gap between IT, Engineering and Business, such as an Information Systems degree, which is typically a Bachelor of Business Administration. Additionally, candidates that can show exposure to Information Technology or Engineering related disciplines in business related roles are one step ahead in the hiring process. Recently, we have been seeing various business related positions becoming much more technologically focused.”

In March of 2015, Indeed conducted thorough research in order to determine where the most STEM opportunities are today. Some of the top locations with the largest segment for career growth included Washington D.C., New York, San Francisco, Atlanta, and Boston. These are also the markets that TRC Professional Solutions is seeing growth in clients hiring needs for STEM related job opportunities.

Are you a candidate looking to pursue a career in Science, Technology, Engineering or Math? Connect with us on Twitter at @TRC_Professional, we would love to hear how your job search is going!

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