Archive for category recruitment

How to answer the question “What’s your biggest weakness?”

biggest-weaknessIt’s been a standard interview question for so long, it’s become a bit of a cliche. Still, the question “what’s your biggest weakness” is likely to show up, in some form or another, in your interviews.

For example, a hiring manager might ask you about an area for improvement on your last performance review.

So how should you answer?  Many people are tempted to share a weakness that’s really just a strength in disguise. Our advice? Be more authentic than that. Hiring managers can see through the “I’m a perfectionist” answer, and it’ll come across as a brag – even if it’s true. 

At the same time, you don’t have to air your dirty laundry – after all, you are trying to sell yourself, not bash yourself.

Instead, give an honest, specific example of something you’re actively working on improving (be sure to include what you’ve done to successfully address the weakness). People find a little vulnerability charming; it shows you’re putting yourself out there for the job.

Whatever your “biggest weakness,” take our advice, and you’ll be a breath of fresh air to the person interviewing you. After all, hiring managers aren’t as interested in what your biggest weakness is. They’re interested in how you answer the question.

Ready to start interviewing? Visit TRC Staffing Services, Inc to browse temp, temp-to-perm, and full-time opportunities with some of the best companies in the country.

 

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Unexpected ways you’ll be evaluated by recruiters.

Spark-Hire-Reasons-To-Find-A-New-Recruiter-870x400We all know the typical things recruiters look for in any job candidate. But there are also some unexpected ways they go about assessing your skills. Here are a few specific tricks hiring managers, potential bosses and recruiters use to determine what’ll happen once you’re out of the interview and on the job.

Big data. Today, recruiters can use tools that aggregate a candidate’s online presence, scouring profiles, forums, shared projects, and posts to form a more comprehensive picture of your skills, interests, and behaviors. What they say is true: be aware that the things you do online in “public” places should always be things you wouldn’t mind a potential employer seeing.

Receptionists. Yes, hiring managers often refer to office receptionists to get a little more information about how you behave when in front of people you don’t necessarily expect to be evaluating you. Some companies even go so far as to have receptionists fill out their own evaluations of candidates during their brief time in the lobby. So even though it seems obvious, always be courteous and put your best face forward for everyone.

Checks for consistency. Recruiters often check to see if claims on your resume and other professional materials match up with your actions online. If you claim you’re one thing, but the organizations you belong to and job boards you frequent say another, they’ll question your legitimacy.

Surprise tactics. Potential employers sometimes like to get you out of your comfort zone, to see how you’ll react when you’re caught off guard. They may call you after hours, or interrupt you in the middle of an interview panel or test, to see how you handle it. Whatever your potential employer throws your way, it’s okay to be genuinely surprised – just go with the flow, and above all – always be polite.

References you didn’t provide. If a potential boss or hiring manager knows someone you worked with or for, they’ll often reach out, whether you included this person on your list of references or not. That’s just the reality of the small world we live in – word of mouth is your best form of advertising. So even though we all have people we didn’t exactly jive with, do your best to never burn bridges.

Are we missing anything? What are some other screening tactics job candidates should be aware of during their search? We’d love to hear your experience in the comments section below.

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What You Post Today, Will Affect You Tomorrow: A Social Media Lesson from Yelp

https://www.google.com/search?safe=active&site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=934&q=fired+by+social+media&oq=fired+by+social+media&gs_l=img.3..0i24.988.3554.0.3753.21.9.0.12.12.0.88.596.9.9.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.21.632.okZh9zbDtwk#imgrc=JBBqGfFgm_IlmM%3AIf you have been keeping up with the latest Technology news, you have probably heard about the dissatisfied Yelp girl. If you haven’t, the Yelp employee (Talia Jane, 25) was a Customer-Support Representative based out of Silicon Valley. She wrote a very detailed, emotional blog called “An Open Letter To My CEO” – which went into depth about the San Francisco housing crisis, her emotional stress, poor wages paid by her employer, and a little bit about her career aspirations.

“So here I am, 25 years old, balancing all sorts of debt and trying to pave a life for myself that doesn’t involve crying in the bathtub every week.”- Talia Jane

After the blog was posted, Talia Jane was let go from her position at Yelp almost immediately. There has been a lot of discussion on social media the matter. Most of the talk is being based around tech wages, Millennials, and whether or not the girl should have been let go at all. All of these discussions are valid, but there is one discussion in particular that should be duly noted. It is VITAL to always stay professional on social media, even if you believe you have a valid point to make regarding your employment.

This situation is a prime example of letting your emotions take hold of your career. Talia went from having a job that paid the bills (kinda), to not having a job at all. In her case, she is getting a lot of attention but that isn’t the case for everyone who declares war on a company through social media. In fact, if you break any HR policies by talking negatively about your company or providing “insider information”, you can even get sued.

Misusing social media will not only affect your career today but tomorrow as well. If you speak negatively online about people or companies, remember that other will see this. Future employers will be unimpressed, recruiters will see it as unprofessional, and you could damage a potential job interview before you even have a chance to speak with the company.

If you are feeling frustrated with your work, take a step back and look at the big picture. Whatever your problems is – you don’t like your job, your boss is rude, you don’t like the person who sits near you, etc. is it really going to help if you post about it online? Even if your account settings are on lock-down and are private, nothing is private online. Someone, somewhere, could find it . . . leaving you one screenshot away from dipping into your savings.

Whatever your problem is at work: think through it; or talk it over with someone who is separated from the situation, and think about your career logically. Acting in the moment doesn’t always help (though sometimes we admit it does feel good). Even if you can’t fix your problem and want to leave, put in your two weeks’ notice the appropriate way. This way, you can use your current company as a reference.

Everyone has positive and negative situations they have to handle at work. What are a few professional tips you have to relieve stress? Tell us about them by commenting below.

 

 

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Advancements in Technology Leads to Evolution in the Recruitment Process

RecruitmentRecruitment has certainly evolved over time and the role of technology continues to play an instrumental part throughout the hiring process. From the development of recruitment agencies in the 1940’s to the launch of LinkedIn in 2003, there has been monumental progress that has ultimately transformed today’s employment landscape. New technological advancements will continue to drive the future of recruitment strategy. But, how exactly has this process evolved and where do job seekers stand moving forward? Let’s take a look and see how it all began:

In the 1950’s, the CV became the standard means when it came to listing out qualifications and experiences to potential employers. This process began to slowly transform in the 1970’s when recruitment agencies started to modify and filter how they searched for candidates. During this time, the first job advertisements appeared in newspapers and commercial computers slowly made their way into the market.

Shortly after the launch of Apple’s first PC in 1976, the development of applicant tracking systems soon followed. In the 2000’s, recruitment methods took off rapidly as 43% of job seekers used the Internet in their job search in 2003. In 2010, organizations began to implement Social Media within their business practices and as a way to connect and engage with potential candidates with their brand.

Since then, the rise in Smartphone usage has impacted the way we connect with employers, candidates, and hiring managers. The heavy increase in mobile traffic means that employers needed a plan in order to accommodate today’s mobile friendly demographic. Organizations are now focusing on reorganizing their entire website infrastructure to accommodate the changes in candidate behavior. A recent study from Kelton Global reveals that “70% of job seekers are willing to apply for a job via smartphone, but more than a quarter of larger companies said that not a single part of their hiring process has been mobile-optimized.” By the end of 2015, 86% of active candidates will use their smartphone to begin a job search.

The evolution doesn’t stop here. Technology will continue to serve as the direct liaison among all aspects of the hiring process. If you have any feedback on how technology has helped you throughout your career, connect with us today or join the conversation with us on Twitter!

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