Why a niche staffing firm could be the key to that dream job

https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1829&bih=890&q=staffing+firm&oq=staffing+firm&gs_l=img.3..0j0i24k1l9.1248.3263.0.3413.15.13.1.1.1.0.100.883.12j1.13.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.15.899...0i10k1j0i30k1j0i5i30k1j0i8i30k1.9X68O7KKjL0#tbm=isch&q=career&imgrc=m81ZK9Fgblp83M%3AIf you’re an experienced professional searching for a new job, you may not think you need help. But a specialized staffing firm can be a powerful ally – for some key reasons. Here are a few.

  1.  You need to know exactly what to say, and how to say it, to get the job. You won’t always know what your potential employer is looking for, no matter how carefully you read the job description. And even if you’re perfect for the job, some people have trouble conveying that in an interview. A niche staffing firm can let you know which of your skills you should emphasize, and coach you on how to shine. So you’ll go into the interview confident and completely prepared.
  2. Your resume can’t make you, but it can break you. A resume alone won’t win you the job. Yet one little grammatical can ruin your chances. A staffing firm will critique your resume, and won’t send it along to a potential employer until it’s perfect.
  3. Your career is one of the most important aspects of your life. It needs to be in good hands. Obviously, you are the most important determiner of how successful your career will be. But when you work with people who are specialized in your specific line of work, and how to market yourself for it, you stand the best possible chance of landing the job you want – which will only open doors to more opportunities down the road. Niche staffing firms also have insider knowledge and strong relationships within your industry – so they are absolutely a competitive advantage.

Those are just a few of the reasons a staffing firm can be a great asset to your job search. To learn more, visit TRC Professional Solutions today.

If you’re ready to pursue your next opportunity, browse jobs now in information technology, engineering finance or accounting.

 

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New data on jobs and salaries helps students pick careers

choosing-best-salary-marilyn-vos-savantWe talk so often about the skills gap, and what society might do to fix it. Well, Minnesota is taking some smart steps. While many states track earnings of residents after college, Minnesota is going beyond just making that information available online. The state enlists people to share the findings with students and college staff in person and through an interactive website. Students can then make informed decisions about what skills are in demand, and which majors give them the most earning potential after graduation.

The findings from these data systems and salary trackers are interesting, and often unexpected. For example, more education doesn’t always mean higher earnings. Often, technical programs have a greater return on investment, particularly during the early years.

 Of course, salary isn’t everything. There are many considerations to make when choosing a career. But it’s smart to understand the big picture of future earnings and marketability when deciding what training and education to choose – and how much to spend on it. And this sort of communication between government, hiring companies, and students is a smart way to address the talent gap.

 

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Could one calculus class be affecting the STEM gender gap?

calculus__10__vectorized__24303__84413_1329422573_1280_1280Along with an overall skills gap, we also know there’s a big gender gap when it comes to science, technology, engineering and mathematics. While women make up about half the workforce, they only hold about a quarter of STEM jobs.

 But why is this? Throughout grades K-12, boys and girls generally show equal interest and performance in STEM subjects. So why don’t these girls go on to pursue math and science careers?

 According to a new study on the STEM gender gap, a major exit point for women in STEM is the college course Calculus I. Men and women with the same abilities go into the class, but women are 1.5 times more likely than men to abandon their STEM majors after the class.

 Researches don’t blame grades, but a difference in the students’ confidence levels. The researchers interviewed both genders before and after the class, and concluded that the men interviewed were less likely to be dissuaded by a bad grade or other challenge related to the class. If only women would stick out the Calculus I class, and continue on with the support and encouragement of people around them, this one change might play at least some role in plugging the gender gap.

 If nothing else, the study’s findings hold an important message for everyone. Don’t let the learning process – with its normal and expected failures – deter you on the way to success.

 

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Take that vacation.

https://goo.gl/kMWDnTSummer is the time for travel and leisure – or at least, it used to be. Today, many U.S. workers aren’t taking their vacation time.

The reasons vary, but there’s a common theme: work burnout. Many people state that by the time summer vacation rolls around, they’re completely exhausted from their jobs. Add to that that today it’s more difficult than ever to actually unplug, resulting in a vacation so full of urgent emails and pings that “getting away” can actually create more headaches than just staying put in the office.

 Instead, people use their vacation time to run errands, go to the doctor, clean the house, and play catch up.

There’s another reason people aren’t taking vacation. It’s the false notion, and one characteristic of the U.S., that whoever is at work the most time is the winner. People worry that taking time to enjoy life will cause them to seem like a slacker – and that’s unfortunate. Because there are better, smarter ways to show dedication to your job than just showing up. Working efficiently and effectively, and giving your all to your job when you’re there is more important than being there 24-7.

 After all, it pays to show dedication to your health, too. By taking some time off – and not feeling guilting about it – to enjoy your family, friends, and life. In fact, you can be an example to those around you by not buying in to the idea that to take vacation is to not be a great employee. If you’re a great employee, no one is going to hold your vacation against you – and if they do, you might not be in the right company.

So this summer, take your vacation. Maybe it’s a trip to an exotic locale, or maybe it’s just some rest and relaxation at home. However you choose to spend your vacation, remember – you’ve earned it, so enjoy it.

 

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Want to work remotely? You’re in luck.

https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=934&q=remote+work&oq=remote+work&gs_l=img.3..0l10.30100.31706.0.33257.11.9.0.2.2.0.106.575.7j2.9.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.11.594.nPZrIzULFs8#imgrc=g54u5FG8HeHgJM%3AWith high-speed Internet a given almost everywhere – and local STEM talent not a given anywhere (even in popular tech hubs), it’s not surprising that working remotely is an increasing trend in the tech industry.

 Employers are getting creative in their search for potential employees – and that means looking remotely, then offering candidates job opportunities without requiring them to relocate.

 It seems like a win-win for both tech workers and employers, but it isn’t always. For example, working in an actual office, where interactions are in-person, not only makes communication easier and more efficient, it also makes it more personal. Without those face-to-face communications, it can be difficult to build rapport.

 Yet even with the challenges working from afar presents, the Internet keeps us more connected than ever. Building solid relationships while working remotely is possible, it just requires a certain type of worker who is excellent at staying in the loop and reaching out via email or phone to keep communication open.

 And although employers are offering opportunities to work remotely, they won’t hire just anyone for those positions. They’re looking for people with proven experience completing big projects from home without close supervision. And as always, they’re looking for proven results. Tech workers with this type of experience under their belts should have no trouble working remotely if they choose to do so.

 Looking for a new opportunity in engineering, information technology, or finance and accounting? Contact TRC Professional Solutions today.

 

 

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Marketing Tips for Freelance Tech Pros

If you’re tempted to trade your full-time tech job for the freelance lifestyle, you’re going to have to do a little marketing, too – of yourself. Don’t let that thought overwhelm or dissuade you, though. As a tech pro, your skills are already in demand. All you need is a simple strategy to keep a steady cash flow, and you’ll do great. These three tips will help you succeed, should you decide to strike out on your own.

 1. Always be looking.

 Keep your online portfolio up-to-date. Indicate on social media when you’re available. Keep your ears out, and keep others in the loop so they can keep their ears out for you too. Essentially, you need to always be searching. It isn’t as much of a hustle as it may seem though. With time, being in job hunting mode will be second nature. And it will keep you busy with plenty of freelance work.

 2.  Build your online presence.

 Establishing and growing an online presence are part of the “always looking” mentality. But thinking outside the usual LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter will help you tremendously. For example, answering questions on tech forums like Quora and Stack Exchange will draw business from people who find your answers intelligent and thorough. Blogging presents opportunities to get your name out there, as well as demonstrate your knowledge and skills. Those are just a couple of outlets that that offer a great ROI on your time, beyond the bare minimum social media profiles – though these are important, too.

 3.  Let others do the work for you.

 Be choosy – after all, you don’t want to waste your time or anyone else’s – but make sure you take advantage of recruiters and tech managers who know exactly what tech niche you’re interested in, and can take on a lot of the burden of marketing you. It’s a win for them if they place you in your perfect project, so they’ll prove a valuable tool should you decide to try freelancing.

 Looking for the next step in your tech career? Contact TRC Professional Solutions for help matching your skill set to exciting projects all over the country.

 

 

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Summer reading material for the career-minded.

https://goo.gl/ueGdnFIn search of something to read this summer by the pool or on the beach? How about a book that will, along with the sound of waves crashing on the shore, refresh and revitalize your motivation in your career and life in general?

 Sound appealing? Then check out this list of books that are guaranteed to recharge your drive, as well as offer some sound career advice.

 Refuse to Choose!: Use All of Your Interests, Passions, and Hobbies to Create the Life and Career of Your Dreams by Barbara Sher.  If you’re someone with a lot of passions, and a job history to match, don’t feel like you have to pick one thing and stick with it. There’s a way to combine your loves into a successful career just for you – and this book will help you understand how to do it.

 Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ by Daniel Goleman.  Empathy and excellent communication skills can be harnessed, resulting in tremendous career success. Read this book and learn how to use yours to your great advantage.

 Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel Pink.  Never follow money. That’s the premise of this book. Instead, understand that what motivates you is autonomy, mastery, and purpose. This book provides a road map to using them to find satisfaction in your career and life.

 The Slight Edge: Turning Simple Disciplines Into Massive Success and Happiness by Jeff Olson.  Wouldn’t it be nice if you could make a tiny change, and change your life? According to this book, you can. The idea is to find that “one thing” that will help you achieve your goal, then do it daily. And that one thing may be much simpler than you think. Read this book and perhaps you’ll discover yours.

 Love Your Job: The New Rules for Career Happiness by Kerry Hannon.  Maybe you don’t need to look any further than where you are right now to be happy in your career. The goal of this book is to inspire and instruct you in how to transform a blah job into a meaningful and fulfilling one. Even if you intend to leave your job, it seems quite wise to know how to make the most of the present.

 Do you have any favorite career advice books of your own? We’d love to hear your recommendations, and why you love them, in the comments section below.

 

 

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