Posts Tagged engineering

Want to work remotely? You’re in luck.

https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=934&q=remote+work&oq=remote+work&gs_l=img.3..0l10.30100.31706.0.33257.11.9.0.2.2.0.106.575.7j2.9.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.11.594.nPZrIzULFs8#imgrc=g54u5FG8HeHgJM%3AWith high-speed Internet a given almost everywhere – and local STEM talent not a given anywhere (even in popular tech hubs), it’s not surprising that working remotely is an increasing trend in the tech industry.

 Employers are getting creative in their search for potential employees – and that means looking remotely, then offering candidates job opportunities without requiring them to relocate.

 It seems like a win-win for both tech workers and employers, but it isn’t always. For example, working in an actual office, where interactions are in-person, not only makes communication easier and more efficient, it also makes it more personal. Without those face-to-face communications, it can be difficult to build rapport.

 Yet even with the challenges working from afar presents, the Internet keeps us more connected than ever. Building solid relationships while working remotely is possible, it just requires a certain type of worker who is excellent at staying in the loop and reaching out via email or phone to keep communication open.

 And although employers are offering opportunities to work remotely, they won’t hire just anyone for those positions. They’re looking for people with proven experience completing big projects from home without close supervision. And as always, they’re looking for proven results. Tech workers with this type of experience under their belts should have no trouble working remotely if they choose to do so.

 Looking for a new opportunity in engineering, information technology, or finance and accounting? Contact TRC Professional Solutions today.

 

 

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What You Post Today, Will Affect You Tomorrow: A Social Media Lesson from Yelp

https://www.google.com/search?safe=active&site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=934&q=fired+by+social+media&oq=fired+by+social+media&gs_l=img.3..0i24.988.3554.0.3753.21.9.0.12.12.0.88.596.9.9.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.21.632.okZh9zbDtwk#imgrc=JBBqGfFgm_IlmM%3AIf you have been keeping up with the latest Technology news, you have probably heard about the dissatisfied Yelp girl. If you haven’t, the Yelp employee (Talia Jane, 25) was a Customer-Support Representative based out of Silicon Valley. She wrote a very detailed, emotional blog called “An Open Letter To My CEO” – which went into depth about the San Francisco housing crisis, her emotional stress, poor wages paid by her employer, and a little bit about her career aspirations.

“So here I am, 25 years old, balancing all sorts of debt and trying to pave a life for myself that doesn’t involve crying in the bathtub every week.”- Talia Jane

After the blog was posted, Talia Jane was let go from her position at Yelp almost immediately. There has been a lot of discussion on social media the matter. Most of the talk is being based around tech wages, Millennials, and whether or not the girl should have been let go at all. All of these discussions are valid, but there is one discussion in particular that should be duly noted. It is VITAL to always stay professional on social media, even if you believe you have a valid point to make regarding your employment.

This situation is a prime example of letting your emotions take hold of your career. Talia went from having a job that paid the bills (kinda), to not having a job at all. In her case, she is getting a lot of attention but that isn’t the case for everyone who declares war on a company through social media. In fact, if you break any HR policies by talking negatively about your company or providing “insider information”, you can even get sued.

Misusing social media will not only affect your career today but tomorrow as well. If you speak negatively online about people or companies, remember that other will see this. Future employers will be unimpressed, recruiters will see it as unprofessional, and you could damage a potential job interview before you even have a chance to speak with the company.

If you are feeling frustrated with your work, take a step back and look at the big picture. Whatever your problems is – you don’t like your job, your boss is rude, you don’t like the person who sits near you, etc. is it really going to help if you post about it online? Even if your account settings are on lock-down and are private, nothing is private online. Someone, somewhere, could find it . . . leaving you one screenshot away from dipping into your savings.

Whatever your problem is at work: think through it; or talk it over with someone who is separated from the situation, and think about your career logically. Acting in the moment doesn’t always help (though sometimes we admit it does feel good). Even if you can’t fix your problem and want to leave, put in your two weeks’ notice the appropriate way. This way, you can use your current company as a reference.

Everyone has positive and negative situations they have to handle at work. What are a few professional tips you have to relieve stress? Tell us about them by commenting below.

 

 

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How to Generate More Women in STEM

https://www.google.com/search?safe=active&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=911&q=women+in+stem&oq=women+in+stem&gs_l=img.3..0l10.928.2205.0.2355.13.12.0.1.1.0.145.1306.5j7.12.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.13.1309.IE3oz6a1qvo#imgrc=z_7ffiXUPbsJ7M%3AIt’s no secret, there are not enough women in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math industries. The U.S. Department of Commerce showed women – compared to men – only make up of 24% of STEM jobs. Why is this? Why are there so few women?

A research report by AAUW showed that women face environmental and social barriers that prevent progress. These barriers include everything from stereotyping to gender biases. How can these biases be defeated to create a level playing field for Women in STEM? By generating more interest in the next generation of women.

Most STEM positions require a degree, which is why it is so important to start educating younger generations now. One specific group dedicated to doing just that is women from Empire Company Limited, which recently partnered with a local non-profit organization named Sacred SISTAHS to run workshops for over 150 African American girls ages 13-18. These girls are being educated and given opportunities to speak with influential women in these four industries. For some of the girls, it’s their first experience with Science, Technology, Engineering and Math and it’s sparking an interest!

Another way influential leaders are helping to develop diversity is by mentoring women at an early age. They are fighting the stereotypes that girls in STEM are “nerdy”, and are providing contacts and networks for these young women’s futures.

In addition, the White House Council on Women and Girls is collaborating with The Office of Science and Technology to increase women and girls participation in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math industries.

One of the things that I really strongly believe in is that we need to have more girls interested in math, science, and engineering. We’ve got half the population that is way underrepresented in those fields and that means that we’ve got a whole bunch of talent…not being encouraged the way they need to.”

— President Barack Obama, February 2013

With the STEM industries projected growth from 2008-2018 to be 17%, how could women not want to focus on receiving degrees to better their current job, or find a future one? Rightfully so, STEM workers receive 33% higher wages compared to non-STEM positions.

Are you interested in applying for open STEM positions now? Check out TRC Professional Solutions job board for current available positions.

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Why You Should Make the Transition To DevOps

https://www.google.co.uk/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=940&q=DevOps&oq=DevOps&gs_l=img.3..0l10.2340.3747.0.3962.6.5.0.1.1.0.24.74.5.5.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..0.6.75.r9u8BoLpRSM#imgrc=fg19lc51O3L3nM%3AAre you looking to define and shape your career? Interested in finding a position that is in high demand with opportunity for growth? It might be time for you to take a look at Development Operation, also known as DevOps.

DevOps is a term that has only been around for about 6 years now, but it is in high demand for the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math industries (STEM). DevOps is one of the fastest growing skills sets in the country and it is extremely competitive. It should be! With companies such as Google, Amazon, Twitter, and Netflix seeking candidates to fill these positions, the costs to hire professionals with these skills is skyrocketing. It’s in such high demand that recruiters are having trouble finding candidates to fill positions because they are being taken off the market within 2-3 days.

Why is this position in such high demand? Why are these DevOps candidates so desirable? Companies are seeking candidates to fill these positions because it incorporates software development, communication, quality assurance, and collaboration with team members. This position mitigates a lot of headaches between programmers and system administrators that manage servers. Basically, a DevOps position acts as the middleman. It makes operations run smoothly and helps organizations achieve optimal running of software.

There are a few basic qualifications needed for a career in DevOps. First, a solid understanding of Python or similar scripting experience is a must. Candidates also need expertise in Apache, MySQL, and PHP (LAMP stack). Knowledge of automation tools is also required, as well as knowledge of infrastructure related projects. Get these skills and you can start applying for this in demand position!

Are you interested in pursuing a DevOps career and want to be sure you find the right company? Utilize TRC Professional Solutions recruiters. They are constantly searching the market to find prime candidates to fill in demand positions.

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The Federal Government Helps STEM Students Find A College

For people considering a degree and career in computer science, engineering, finance, accounting, information technology, or other technical discipline – there’s a site they may want to check out. It’s called College Scorecard. 

The federal government’s recently redesigned website provides data from over 7,000 colleges and universities. That data includes tuition, graduation rates, SAT scores, average salaries post-graduation, and other information people can use to decide if the school is right for them. The site includes the option to sort by size, programs, location and other filters.

 It’s just one small part of a larger effort on behalf of the government to encourage and bolster the pursuit of STEM careers – a much-needed and sought-after skill set at companies these days.

 As for those who are searching for an IT, computer science, engineering, finance or accounting position – professional recruiters are ready and willing to help. TRC Professional Solutions is a professional staffing agency that specializes in technical opportunities for job candidates with those skill sets. Whether project-based or full-time, we have opportunities in every discipline waiting for the perfect candidate. Search the TRC Professional Solutions job boards for opportunities all over the country.

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Engineering, the “Most Valuable Degree” in Higher Ed

Staffingtalk.com recently commented on a write-up by Fred Wilson of AVC titled “The Value of an Engineering Degree.” It’s a pretty interested article and you should check it out if you’re an engineer, considering becoming one, or a teacher of potential engineers.

Interesting quotes from the article include the following.

• “NYC [and much of the world] is starved for the kind of technical, quantitative, and analytical minds that engineering schools generate.”

• “With an engineering degree and in a big city…they can earn more in a year than their parents combined.”

• “There are more technical jobs open than qualified candidates to fill them. It is the one bright spot in an otherwise bleak employment picture.”

• “We need to be investing in our engineering schools and…in a K-12 education that gets our children ready to go to these schools.”

We could not agree more. And check out this table of ROIs on engineering degrees:

20-year-ROI-on-education

Finally, make sure to check out the comments. There are some great ones from engineers.

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No Shortage of People or Jobs, Just a Shortage of Matches

wpid-recruitment-lead4Despite a sea of open positions and job seekers, news of a skills gap continues, across seas.  In British Columbia, a lack of skilled labor has temporarily halted a multi-billion dollar engineering project.  The Canadian government has recently come under fire from the Canadian Employee Relocation Council for proposing changes to its Temporary Foreign Worker Program in an effort to limit hires from abroad. Canada’s unemployment rate is seven percent.

In Japan, rebuilding after the 2011 tsunami continues, but not as quickly as it might without an understandably over-stretched construction industry and resulting skilled worker shortage.  Japan is expanding their foreign labor use, but training workers for skilled positions can take as many as 10 years.

And all over the world, IT plays a more crucial role in business success than ever.

Employers face fierce competition for tech professionals, and positions go unfilled because employers can’t find – or attract – the right talent. Though according to this article, growing market sensibilities should help alleviate some of the partially self-inflicted IT staffing crunch.

In other news, according to the Labor Department’s February jobs report, professional services, like engineering, grew by 79,000 after two consecutive months of relatively slow hiring.  This category of workers has grown the fastest since the Great Recession ended in mid-2009. One third of those jobs were temporary.

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