Posts Tagged resume

Don’t make these common mistakes on your tech resume.

healthcare-technology-8-04-2015Writing a professional tech resume seems simple enough, but there’s an art to writing a great one. To improve your own resume and make landing the interviews you want easier, check your resume against these common mistakes.

 Stretching the truth.

With tech employers getting pickier about exactly what sort of technical skills they need, it may be tempting to exaggerate some of the details on your resume. But it almost never pays off in the long run. The truth is, tech recruiters do their research – and often discover these stretches. And even when they don’t, if you get the job, your new company will likely realize that how you came across on paper is inconsistent with how you perform on the job. It’s better to exceed expectations than to disappoint, so just be honest from the get-go – starting with your resume.

 Not being specific enough.

While it’s important to be honest on your resume, it’s also important to give yourself credit where credit is due. And that means replacing vague, meaningless language with impactful, specific actions. For example, instead of just saying you “created software,” include the type of software, your exact role, and the result of your efforts.

 Skipping your results.

Don’t just list your projects and job responsibilities. Explain the impact you had on your organization. After all, this is the bottom line of what any hiring manager really wants to know – how you will impact their organization.

 Forgetting about keywords.

If your skills are in engineering, information technology, or finance or accounting, don’t forget to include more specific keywords, that speak to exactly to your expertise and skill set, in the body of your resume. Recruiters scan for these words in order to find the perfect fit for each available job – and so do programs created to sort through digital resumes. Make sure yours doesn’t get lost, just because you weren’t specific enough about your technical skills.

 Setting the wrong tone.

Be professional in tone. Always. That means forget trying to be funny – it’s difficult to pull off and can come across as silly, and not in a good way. So just convey the facts succinctly, cordially, and effectively. If you’ve done that, you’ll eventually end up on the desk of the hiring manager, for a company where you’ll be a great fit.

 Looking for the perfect new career opportunity in engineering, information technology, finance or accounting? Go to TRC Professional Solutions to learn more.

 

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How to Change Your Career Specialty

https://www.google.com/search?safe=active&site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1920&bih=934&q=changing+careers&oq=changing+careers&gs_l=img.3..0l4j0i30l3j0i5i30j0i24l2.866.2517.0.2596.16.12.0.3.3.0.140.854.11j1.12.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..1.15.872.sXOb-80cOs4#imgrc=wD9gUJkg5QTdSM%3AChanging jobs has its challenges, but changing fields is a whole other matter. No matter how much theoretical knowledge you may possess, the bottom line is that hiring managers really like you to have experience. That doesn’t mean you should let your lack of experience deter you from taking a risk and trying something new. Everyone has to start somewhere, and jumping through a few hoops in the short term can really pay off for your long-term happiness.

Let’s say you’ve been working in IT for 10 years, and you’d really like to move to a new field of information technology. While you’ve studied up on your own and feel you’ve got a good understanding of the field, you don’t have any actual work experience. How do you proceed?

First, keep in mind that if you’ve been a strong performer and are highly valued in your current position, this will speak volumes to hiring managers. That’s because employers are smart enough to choose a sure bet over someone with a perfect skillset who doesn’t have a clear history of always delivering. So make sure you’ve got measurable results to show, as well as recommendations from bosses and colleagues.

Your past success isn’t all you’ll need, if you want to change fields. Make sure you invest in any classes that can help get you fully up to speed on the required skills. You can also join professional organizations and attend events to learn about what’s going on in the field. List these classes and organizations on your resume.

Another great idea is to request a meeting with a hiring manager or recruiter. Without having to be selected for a formal interview, you’ll frame it as a conversation. You can then discuss your goals, and how what you’re working on now relates to what’s required in your new field.

Finally, don’t give up. It may take a little time to make the change, but if you keep at it, it will happen.

Looking for new opportunities in your field, or in a brand new one? We love hearing from qualified candidates. Check out job openings at companies all over the country with TRC Staffing Services, Inc.

 

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